Getting Ready For 2014: Understanding Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs

 

Photo Credit: Google

Photo Credit: Google

Federal legislation such as the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) requiring the phase-out of incandescent bulbs by 2014 has made lighting a confusing topic for consumers. Now, consumers are faced with understanding lingo like wattage, lumens, and voltage in order to buy light bulbs. The issue becomes even more complex when talking about specialized light bulbs for healthcare equipment, aquariums, electronics and appliances, and cars and trucks.

Consumer Household Bulbs

Projectors and televisions, electronics with displays, cameras, laptops, cell phones, toys, and vintage electronic devices… they all use light bulbs in one form or another. Trying to find an energy-efficient light bulb for your refrigerator or your microwave may not be as easy as walking into your neighborhood hardware store. Further, as manufacturers have rushed to supply appropriate lighting, there have been recalls, such as one in May 2013 affecting LED light bulbs produced by Lighting Science Group. We can supply your household light bulb needs, including full-spectrum CFL, LED, and halogen bulbs. We can also supply specialized bulbs for your home appliances, including your refrigerator!

Commercial Bulbs

The legislative mandate will have a huge impact upon businesses and industrial facilities, which face swapping out their incandescent bulbs. We assist businesses of all sizes with this. Just give us a call and we’ll tell you the most economical way to comply with legislation while reducing upfront lighting costs.

Compact Fluorescent Bulbs

Compact fluorescent bulbs produce more light and have a longer life than incandescent bulbs. They use very small amounts of mercury, so they should not be thrown out in your regular trash. Earth 911 is a clearinghouse of information for where to dispose of CFL bulbs if your local government does not have a special disposal or recycling option. CFL bulbs come in many shapes besides the familiar spiral, including plug-in bases, circles and tubes, and chandelier and globe screw-in light bulbs. Use a “dark sky” CFL to keep light from spreading into areas such as a neighbor’s yard.  Reflectors have a built-in reflective surface that helps CFL bulbs to throw off more light, which can assist In providing security. CFL bulbs are less likely than incandescent to break and you can also buy special CFL for exterior use that are shatter-resistant.

Halogen Bulbs

Halogen bulbs are relatively inexpensive, but generate a lot of heat. Care needs to be used when replacing them and they can react to other substances. They emit a bright white life and have  a long lifespan. Halogen bulbs use a halogen gas, a poisonous chemical, with a tungsten filament. Because they are fragile, they are not recommended for homes with small children except in difficult-to-reach fixtures.

LED Bulbs

LED bulbs are light emitting diodes – a small electronic device that lights when electricity is passed through it. These can be designed as very small bulbs for use in electronics displays. They can be expensive, which is offset by their long life. They generate more heat than halogen and xenon bulbs, but less than CFL bulbs. They have an intense, focused light that is ideal for task lighting, not ambient lighting. They are also used, like halogen and xenon bulbs, is specialty auto lighting.

Xenon Bulbs

Xenon light bulbs are often used in specialty auto headlights and in exterior path lighting. They are usually low voltage and can be touched with your bare hand, unlike halogen lights. Xenon bulbs emit a clean white light and may be used in high-intensity discharge (HID) lighting. Festoon xenon light bulbs can be used in either task lighting or for indirect lighting under cabinets and shelves.  When using them in a store with glass or jewelry, choose a clear festoon bulb. Otherwise, frosted bulbs have a wide range of applications.  Xenon is more efficient than halogen, uses less energy, and has a longer life.

Any questions? Call us and we’ll shed more light on the different alternative to incandescent light bulbs as we enter 2014.

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